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Link Pack #05

Lever Rukhin Photographs Los Angeles From His Car
Lever Rukhin shoots the sketchiest parts of Los Angeles from his car, taking a really unique perspective that helps you perceive what LA looks like, if you were in a car… An experience that is apparently common to all LA people. People drive too much in the US :-).

It’s a very interesting interview that goes well with his full site: Lev Rukhin.

What I love about this, besides the whole premise, is that Lev went the extra mile and actually hacked his car to make the images he wanted:

Phoblographer: It looks like many of these images have artificial lighting in them. What’s your gear setup, and how do you introduce so much light into the scene from your car?

Lever: About 9 months ago, I affixed a Mola beauty dish onto the roof rack of my ’75 Volvo and juice it with a profoto bi-tube. This takes a bit of practice, as making a turn changes the light completely, which I always try to keep balanced. The Canon 5D3 with a 24mm f1.4 is set up on a tripod. The strobe has allowed me to capture more detail as well as creating a somewhat surreal feel to the sets.

Lev Rukhin
Lev Rukhin http://www.levrukhin.com/

The Invisible Woman: A conversation with Björk
Björk is that Icelandic singer we all hear about but never really pay much attention to because her music is too smart for our simple ears. In this interview she goes over how her latest album is a very personal work, and unexpectedly (?) ends talking about how problematic it’s been to be a female auteur in her generation.

I have seen the same problem she denounces about people assuming that the male members of a team did all the work while the women just sticked to making coffee and sandwiches. I’ve worked with exceptional women that don’t get enough credit, but I’ve also worked with potentially exceptional women who don’t give themselves enough credit.

It’s a very interesting read, specially since it comes from someone who couldn’t be higher in the “art” food chain. Björk is god-damn Björk.

Only thing that bugs me is that Pitchfork decided to hold back most of the interview for publishing next month. I’ll try to go back and read it in full, but I wonder if the technique works for them or if perhaps they are missing the opportunity for a bigger impact. But I digress.

Pitchfork: The world has a difficult time with the female auteur.

B: I have nothing against Kanye West. Help me with this—I’m not dissing him—this is about how people talk about him. With the last album he did, he got all the best beatmakers on the planet at the time to make beats for him. A lot of the time, he wasn’t even there. Yet no one would question his authorship for a second. If whatever I’m saying to you now helps women, I’m up for saying it. For example, I did 80% of the beats on Vespertine and it took me three years to work on that album, because it was all microbeats—it was like doing a huge embroidery piece. Matmos came in the last two weeks and added percussion on top of the songs, but they didn’t do any of the main parts, and they are credited everywhere as having done the whole album. [Matmos’] Drew [Daniel] is a close friend of mine, and in every single interview he did, he corrected it. And they don’t even listen to him. It really is strange.

In Defense of the Selfie Stick
Miguel proposes a different take on the consequences of the selfies stick:

When you ask someone to take a picture of you, technically, they are the photographer, and they own the copyright of your picture.

(…)

All of a sudden, your backpacking adventure in Europe requires you to pack a stack of legal contracts.

Now your exchange goes from “Can you take a picture of us?” to “Can you take a picture of us, making sure that the church is on the top right corner, and also, I am going to need you to sign this paper”.

I don’t know what’s with the selfie stick hate. Let people have fun, it doesn’t hurt. If anything, it prevents them from asking you to take their photo, and if we already established you are the kind of people not a big fan of strangers, all the better, right?

Why Top Tech CEOs Want Employees With Liberal Arts Degrees
Here’s a small extra. When I decided to pursue a humanities/art formal training, I got many naysayers telling me that I was screwing up not specializing even more as a formal (titled) engineer. I argued then, and now, that if I was gonna pay for training, I might as well pay for training outside my comfort zone.

The result resonates perfectly with this article. Of course, it’s not like the thing is settled, but I can back the various quotes in there.

Working with purely technical/engineering types can be an echo chamber, and having trained myself in the humanities and arts I have become incredibly much more sensitive to the human factor of things. I used to think I was already good at this (because we hacker types have lots of confidence), but studying humanities like human communication, social conflict and development, film language, etc; it all has made me a much more capable hacker of things.

There’s also a nice argument to be made about joining the arts when you are already highly skilled on technical matters. Like Robert Rodríguez’s teacher (mentioned in his diary/book Rebel Without a Cause, which I also have to review soon) used to say (generous paraphrasing here): the world is of those who can be their own creative and their own technician.

Both Yi and Sheer recognize that the scientific method is valuable, with its emphasis on logic and reason, especially when dealing with data or engineering problems. But they believe this approach can sometimes be limiting. “When I collaborate with people who have a strictly technical background,” says Yi, “the perspective I find most lacking is an understanding of what motivates people and how to balance multiple factors that are at work outside the realm of technology.”

Interesting food for thought, specially if you know an engineer that ditches the arts as of little value for personal growth in their careers/life.


Read more Link Pack, you’ll love it

  • Link Pack #05 - Lever Rukhin Photographs Los Angeles From His Car Lever Rukhin shoots the sketchiest parts of Los Angeles from his car, taking a really unique perspective that helps you perceive what LA looks like, if you were in a car… An experience that is apparently common to all LA people. People drive too much in the…
  • Link Pack #04 - Writing Your Way to Happiness (nytimes.com) Researches believe that the way we think about, and remember, “our story” can be so powerful that it can actually influence our happiness and success. It’s a nice little article summarizing actual research. The main study referred put fresh university students to test: a group received tools to “rewrite”…
  • Link Pack #03 - What’s that? The third edition of Link Pack of course! Playing with Power (7 minutes, Vimeo) A super awesome story about a stop motion animator that turned a Nintendo Power Glove into the perfect animation tool. It’s a fun, inspiring video :-). I love the Power Glove, it’s so bad. The Power Glove – Angry…
  • Link Pack #02 - First sequel to my Link Pack “series” (I’ll remove the quotes when it’s LP#05): Link Pack #01. This time I’m going for fewer articles, to try to keep things less overwhelming. There’s no special theme, and I’m actually leaving out some nice things I read recently. On the plus side, that means I have good…
  • Link pack #01 - Following the lead of my dear friend Daniel and his fantastic and addictive “Summing up” series, here’s a link pack of recent stuff I read around the web. Link pack is definitely a terrible name, but I’m working on it. How to Silence Negative Thinking On how to avoid the pitfall of being a Negatron…
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Link Pack #04

Writing Your Way to Happiness (nytimes.com)
Researches believe that the way we think about, and remember, “our story” can be so powerful that it can actually influence our happiness and success. It’s a nice little article summarizing actual research. The main study referred put fresh university students to test: a group received tools to “rewrite” their memory and story of their academic performance, another group didn’t. The first group improved their grades and had only 1 student drop school within a year, the other group had 4 drop outs and no specific improvement.

I’ve been thinking about this as I recently rewrote my About page and also started writing down some past Travel journals. Looking back and rewriting your own story is incredibly empowering, it’s a fantastic rush of confidence and self-assertion. Memory is always betraying us, and remembering our success is not particularly high on the list of things to keep.

The concept is based on the idea that we all have a personal narrative that shapes our view of the world and ourselves. But sometimes our inner voice doesn’t get it completely right. Some researchers believe that by writing and then editing our own stories, we can change our perceptions of ourselves and identify obstacles that stand in the way of better health.

It may sound like self-help nonsense, but research suggests the effects are real.

Students who had been prompted to change their personal stories improved their grade-point averages and were less likely to drop out over the next year than the students who received no information. In the control group, which had received no advice about grades, 20 percent of the students had dropped out within a year. But in the intervention group, only 1 student — or just 5 percent — dropped out.

Old Masters at the Top of Their Game (nytimes.com)
Fantastic read on how these artists defy the conventions of old meaning useless. Masters at their art, they haven’t quit nor have laid to rest and cash their reputation. They keep making, they stay alive (physically and metaphorically) through art.

No rush to get to their age, but still a really interesting “letter from the future”. Full of cheat codes, read this now.

Now I am 79. I’ve written many hundreds of essays, 10 times that number of misbegotten drafts both early and late, and I begin to understand that failure is its own reward. It is in the effort to close the distance between the work imagined and the work achieved wherein it is to be found that the ceaseless labor is the freedom of play, that what’s at stake isn’t a reflection in the mirror of fame but the escape from the prison of the self.

T. H. White, the British naturalist turned novelist to write “The Once and Future King,” calls upon the druid Merlyn to teach the lesson to the young prince Arthur:

“You may grow old and trembling in your anatomies, you may lie awake at night listening to the disorder of your veins, you may miss your only love, you may see the world about you devastated by evil lunatics, or know your honour trampled in the sewers of baser minds. There is only one thing for it then — to learn. Learn why the world wags and what wags it. That is the only thing which the mind can never exhaust, never alienate, never be tortured by, never fear or distrust, and never dream of regretting.”

A Life with a View (ribbonfarm.com)
A somewhat tricky read, but with a nice payback. Take your time, and savor it slowly. It’s a very interesting look into how we keep wanting new stuff, and how we shield from ourselves by looking for the “place with no yearns”, the place where we won’t want anything anymore doesn’t exist.

Chains very well into the reads I shared a few days ago on practical contentment.

The arrival fallacy is about seeking a life from which one can look with a complacent equanimity upon the rest of reality, without yearning. It is an ideal of a life that is defined primarily by blindness to itself. You yearn while you see your life as others see it, until you arrive at a situation where you can disappear into the broader background, and see comfortably without being seen discomfittingly, especially by yourself.

Once you’re there, the yearning stops, so the theory goes. Of course it is a laughably bad theory.

How To Escape From A Moving Car (mrporter.com)
By Adam Kirley, stunt double for Daniel Craig in the crazy crane scene of Casino Royale (where 007 jumps from monkey nuts high to donkey bonkers high, a badger bum crazy distance). Really funny, and one of those things I always find myself thinking… Almost as much as what to do in case of a Post Office Showdown (xkcd.com)

Everyone’s first instinct is to put their hands or legs down first. That’s the worst thing you can do: you will break something. The pointy parts of your body hurt – elbows, knees, hips, ankles. Put your fists under your chin, and bring your elbows together. Keep your chin tucked in to your chest to protect your head. The best point of impact is the back of the shoulder and your back. If you dive out directly onto your shoulder you’ll break it.

What the World Looks Like with Social Anxiety (collegehumor.com)
Funny vignettes about how the world looks like when you are socially anxious. I can only really identify with the last one:

cfd04d22a6dfa4fb858dee8d3d5592af
Shea Strauss.

Helsinki Bus Station Theory (fotocommunity.com)
Don’t get off the bus. Art comes to those who wait and persevere. At first, you replicate the same route others have done, but only if you stay long enough in such path you begin to find your own path. Although perhaps a little more classic in conception, this is an interesting text advising artists to don’t give up just because they don’t compare well to the masters of their current art or genre. Only those who persevere will catch up and diverge from the masters.

You could say that diverging early is also a way to find your path, but there’s still a case to be made for learning from those who came before. Whether you want to imitate them, or rebel against them, you still need to know them.

My take: it doesn’t hurt to pick up some biographies or works from past masters and see what made them masters. Create your master genealogy, kinda like in Steal Like an Artist (which I recently read but haven’t got around to write about yet).

Georges Braque has said that out of limited means, new forms emerge. I say, we find out what we will do by knowing what we will not do.

And so, if your heart is set on 8×10 platinum landscapes in misty southern terrains, work your way through those who inspire you, ride their bus route and damn those who would say you are merely repeating what has been done before. Wait for the months and years to pass and soon your differences will begin to appear with clarity and intelligence, when your originality will become visible, even the works from those very first years of trepidation when everything you did seemed so done before.

At 90, She’s Designing Tech For Aging Boomers (npr.org)
The inspiring tale of a 90 year old woman who joined IDEO to contribute a unique point of view to the design process. You can never stop learning, life never ceases to be interesting. It’s short, and not incredibly shocking, but that this has happened somewhere as referenced and revered as IDEO says a lot.

And for the bulging demographic of baby boomers growing old, Beskind has this advice: Embrace change and design for it.


Previously on Link Pack

  • Link Pack #05 - Lever Rukhin Photographs Los Angeles From His Car Lever Rukhin shoots the sketchiest parts of Los Angeles from his car, taking a really unique perspective that helps you perceive what LA looks like, if you were in a car… An experience that is apparently common to all LA people. People drive too much in the…
  • Link Pack #04 - Writing Your Way to Happiness (nytimes.com) Researches believe that the way we think about, and remember, “our story” can be so powerful that it can actually influence our happiness and success. It’s a nice little article summarizing actual research. The main study referred put fresh university students to test: a group received tools to “rewrite”…
  • Link Pack #03 - What’s that? The third edition of Link Pack of course! Playing with Power (7 minutes, Vimeo) A super awesome story about a stop motion animator that turned a Nintendo Power Glove into the perfect animation tool. It’s a fun, inspiring video :-). I love the Power Glove, it’s so bad. The Power Glove – Angry…
  • Link Pack #02 - First sequel to my Link Pack “series” (I’ll remove the quotes when it’s LP#05): Link Pack #01. This time I’m going for fewer articles, to try to keep things less overwhelming. There’s no special theme, and I’m actually leaving out some nice things I read recently. On the plus side, that means I have good…
  • Link pack #01 - Following the lead of my dear friend Daniel and his fantastic and addictive “Summing up” series, here’s a link pack of recent stuff I read around the web. Link pack is definitely a terrible name, but I’m working on it. How to Silence Negative Thinking On how to avoid the pitfall of being a Negatron…
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Link Pack #03

What’s that? The third edition of Link Pack of course!


Playing with Power (7 minutes, Vimeo)
A super awesome story about a stop motion animator that turned a Nintendo Power Glove into the perfect animation tool. It’s a fun, inspiring video :-). I love the Power Glove, it’s so bad.

The Power Glove – Angry Video Game Nerd – Episode 14 (12 minutes, YouTube)
On the topic of the Power Glove, here’s the now classic Angry Video Game Nerd video about it. James Rolfe is funny.

Ship Your Enemies Glitter
A rising star in the internet business landscape. You pay them $9.99 and they send an envelope full of glitter to your worst enemy. They promise it will jump into everything, as usual. Damn you glitter.

A Guide to Practical Contentment
Be happy with what you have, but understand why:

(…) if you start in this place of fixing what’s wrong with you, you keep looking for what else is wrong with you, what else you need to improve. So maybe now feel like you don’t have enough muscles, or six pack abs, or you think your calves don’t look good, or if it’s not about your body, you’ll find something else.

So it’s this never-ending cycle for your entire life. You never reach it. If you start with a place of wanting to improve yourself and feeling stuck, even if you’re constantly successful and improving, you’re always looking for happiness from external sources. You don’t find the happiness from within, so you look to other things.

The Comments Section For Every Video Where Someone Does A Pushup
Comments. From YouTube. Enough said.

“These are dips. Not pushups. In the entire history of the world, no one has ever successfully performed a pushup. They’re all just dips.”

“STOP DRIVING WITH YOUR HIPS. IF YOU’RE DOING A PUSHUP CORRECTLY, YOUR HIPS SHOULD CEASE TO EXIST.”

“You could do 100 pushups like this and it wouldn’t improve your strength at all. You’re just bending your arms.”

Self-Taught Chinese Street Photographer Tao Liu Has an Eye for Peculiar Moments
This Chinese photog uses his lunch break to snap interesting street photography. Funny selection by PetaPixel, his Flickr page has even more stuff. Even more in his photoblog.

From https://www.flickr.com/photos/58083590@N05/14613273495/
By Liu Tao. https://www.flickr.com/photos/58083590@N05/14613273495/

Enrique Castro-Mendivil’s Agua Dulce photo set
Another interesting photo link. This time it’s the most popular beach in Lima, with most people coming from low income neighborhoods, it shows how fragmented the city is.

By Enrique Castro-Mendivil. http://www.castromendivilphoto.com/index.php/component/content/article/11-work/69-agua-dulce
By Enrique Castro-Mendivil. http://www.castromendivilphoto.com/index.php/component/content/article/11-work/69-agua-dulce

Also on Link Pack

  • Link Pack #05 - Lever Rukhin Photographs Los Angeles From His Car Lever Rukhin shoots the sketchiest parts of Los Angeles from his car, taking a really unique perspective that helps you perceive what LA looks like, if you were in a car… An experience that is apparently common to all LA people. People drive too much in the…
  • Link Pack #04 - Writing Your Way to Happiness (nytimes.com) Researches believe that the way we think about, and remember, “our story” can be so powerful that it can actually influence our happiness and success. It’s a nice little article summarizing actual research. The main study referred put fresh university students to test: a group received tools to “rewrite”…
  • Link Pack #03 - What’s that? The third edition of Link Pack of course! Playing with Power (7 minutes, Vimeo) A super awesome story about a stop motion animator that turned a Nintendo Power Glove into the perfect animation tool. It’s a fun, inspiring video :-). I love the Power Glove, it’s so bad. The Power Glove – Angry…
  • Link Pack #02 - First sequel to my Link Pack “series” (I’ll remove the quotes when it’s LP#05): Link Pack #01. This time I’m going for fewer articles, to try to keep things less overwhelming. There’s no special theme, and I’m actually leaving out some nice things I read recently. On the plus side, that means I have good…
  • Link pack #01 - Following the lead of my dear friend Daniel and his fantastic and addictive “Summing up” series, here’s a link pack of recent stuff I read around the web. Link pack is definitely a terrible name, but I’m working on it. How to Silence Negative Thinking On how to avoid the pitfall of being a Negatron…
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Practical contentment and art

I was browsing Eric Kim’s street photography blog, when I stumbled across one article about the well-known “Gear Acquisition Syndrome” that plagues enthusiast photographers.

Gear Acquisition Syndrome is the obsession that enthusiasts tend to have for new gear, new gadgets, new stuff, as an excuse for not developing their skills or taking action. You can recognize it by phrases like: If only I had that new gear, I would be better at what I do… I can’t do that project until I buy this gear… My super expensive camera is not good for that, I need an even more expensive one… (etc).

The article, “How to Be Grateful For What You Have” is a funny and well argued look on why photographers, or artists in general, can get lost in what they don’t have, instead of what they have.

The article is a recommended read in itself and delivers the point whether you are into photography or not. That said, inside the article I found three nice links worth noting:

The Tiny Collective
A group of photographers that use only their phones as their camera. It’s inspiring to see a specific, curated, selection of images made with phones. It definitely makes you wonder why would you need anything but a phone to make great images (answer: phones work great, even old ones).

A Guide to Practical Contentment
One of the most simple and effective messages about contentment that I have read. It’s not about “not wanting things” or settling for “whatever”. It’s all about taking a step back and realizing that life is not about absolutes. If you are not a billionaire, that doesn’t mean you have failed in life. Perhaps you are just a millionaire, and that’s fine :).

(…) if you start in this place of fixing what’s wrong with you, you keep looking for what else is wrong with you, what else you need to improve. So maybe now feel like you don’t have enough muscles, or six pack abs, or you think your calves don’t look good, or if it’s not about your body, you’ll find something else.

So it’s this never-ending cycle for your entire life. You never reach it. If you start with a place of wanting to improve yourself and feeling stuck, even if you’re constantly successful and improving, you’re always looking for happiness from external sources. You don’t find the happiness from within, so you look to other things.

If you’re externally looking for happiness, it’s easy to get too into food, or shopping, or partying, or overwork, to try to be happy.

If instead, you can find contentment within and not need external sources of happiness, then you’ll have a reliable source of happiness.

So, instead of looking at sources of external happiness, why don’t you look into sources of internal happiness? It’s one of the hardest things to learn how to do, but I’m personally slowly getting there. It’s life changing.

Bonus points: quotes on simplification and minimalism
For extra credit, here are some interesting quotes on the above topics, note that as every internet quote page it might be filled with false quotes. I happen to like the one attributed to Donald Horban, who apparently doesn’t exist outside quote pages in the internet. Maybe that’s the biggest minimalism? Not existing?

“We don’t need to increase our goods nearly as much as we need to scale down our wants. Not wanting something is as good as possessing it.”

Anyway, take these with a grain of salt, and just read them as interesting phrases. Just take it easy :).

Link Pack #02

First sequel to my Link Pack “series” (I’ll remove the quotes when it’s LP#05): Link Pack #01.

This time I’m going for fewer articles, to try to keep things less overwhelming. There’s no special theme, and I’m actually leaving out some nice things I read recently. On the plus side, that means I have good material for a Link Pack #03.

Also, I’m gonna stick with Link Pack as a name, because it’s good enough :-).


A Teenager’s View on Social Media: Written by an actual teen
A well thought and realistic take on how social media is being used nowadays by teenagers. I have seen the patterns the author describes, and actually follow many of them. Does that mean I’m still a teenager?

It’s interesting that the messaging and group-messaging part of the article is very US centric, or at least very US centric from my point of view. WhatsApp is the default messenger application south of the states, and fills the role of “somewhere you can chat with people without having to give them your full personal information”, that is, a place where you can chat with someone without running out of SMS and without adding them on Facebook (which would open them to stalk your whole profile and other friends). Some carriers in South América offer unlimited plans for specific applications like WhatsApp.

What Would Jesus Buy? (2007) — Full movie
“Reverend” Billy Talen from the Church of Stop Shopping Gospel is trying to prevent the Shopocalypse from happening. It’s an entertaining story of a group of funny guys and girls trying to share a message with comedy (that means A+ on my list). Simple and independent, a nice film.

13 Nutrition Lies That Made The World Sick And Fat
A pet peeve of mine. Nutrition is not really that complicated, but unfortunately there are a lot of myths that make people take really bad decisions. If you only read one thing in 2014 2015, read this.

Bottom Line: The low-fat, high-carb diet recommended by the mainstream nutrition organizations is a miserable failure and has been repeatedly proven to be ineffective.

(…)

Bottom Line: Low-carb diets are the easiest, healthiest and most effective way to lose weight and reverse metabolic disease. It is pretty much a scientific fact at this point.

GM’s hit and run: How a lawyer, mechanic, and engineer blew open the worst auto scandal in history
Cars are so complex nowadays, and dependent on electronics, that I’m honestly afraid of them. I have made software for many years and I know how hard, impossible, it is to get things “perfect”. I can’t imagine how hard it is for something so critical as brakes, steering wheels, etc. Even cameras can’t get focus right some times, and it’s been many many years.

Countless articles have been written about General Motors and its massive recalls earlier this year. What hasn’t been fully told is how GM might have gotten away with multiple counts of consumercide were it not for the efforts of three men: a Georgia lawyer, a Mississippi mechanic, and a Florida engineer.

(…)

Brooke Melton needn’t have died that night. She was killed by a corporation’s callous disregard for the safety of its customers, made worse by a regulatory agency reluctant to regulate.

The Long Game: Part 1 and The Long Game: Part 2
Two very short (less than 5 minutes) video essays about how notable people in the story of creativity are always celebrated without mentioning the boring years when they were nothing but losers. It’s a fun little video, worth a watch for the idea and the interesting editing. It feels like someone really wanted to create these.


Moar Link Pack

  • Link Pack #05 - Lever Rukhin Photographs Los Angeles From His Car Lever Rukhin shoots the sketchiest parts of Los Angeles from his car, taking a really unique perspective that helps you perceive what LA looks like, if you were in a car… An experience that is apparently common to all LA people. People drive too much in the…
  • Link Pack #04 - Writing Your Way to Happiness (nytimes.com) Researches believe that the way we think about, and remember, “our story” can be so powerful that it can actually influence our happiness and success. It’s a nice little article summarizing actual research. The main study referred put fresh university students to test: a group received tools to “rewrite”…
  • Link Pack #03 - What’s that? The third edition of Link Pack of course! Playing with Power (7 minutes, Vimeo) A super awesome story about a stop motion animator that turned a Nintendo Power Glove into the perfect animation tool. It’s a fun, inspiring video :-). I love the Power Glove, it’s so bad. The Power Glove – Angry…
  • Link Pack #02 - First sequel to my Link Pack “series” (I’ll remove the quotes when it’s LP#05): Link Pack #01. This time I’m going for fewer articles, to try to keep things less overwhelming. There’s no special theme, and I’m actually leaving out some nice things I read recently. On the plus side, that means I have good…
  • Link pack #01 - Following the lead of my dear friend Daniel and his fantastic and addictive “Summing up” series, here’s a link pack of recent stuff I read around the web. Link pack is definitely a terrible name, but I’m working on it. How to Silence Negative Thinking On how to avoid the pitfall of being a Negatron…
Plush pets

Custom date format when importing photos to Lightroom

If you need to customize the date formats that Lightroom offers when importing photos you can edit the TranslatedStrings.txt file in the directory for the locale you are using.

However, if you use Lightroom in English, the en.lproj folder has no TranslatedStrings.txt file. In this case, you can simply create it and fill only the lines you need to change. Here’s mine:

/Applications/Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 5.app/Contents/Resources/en.lproj/TranslatedStrings.txt:
"$$$/AgImportDialog/ShootArrangement_10/Template=%Y-%m"

You can undo things by simply removing the line, or deleting the file.

More details on these photo.stackexchange.com answers:

2015

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First foggy morning of the year. This is the view from the eleventh floor of an apartment building in Miraflores, right in front of Lima’s coast.

The whole horizon was covered in fireworks a few hours before. Note that selling fireworks has not been very legal for a few years now. Oh, well.